How To Make A Brain Cake?

Using a serrated knife, carve your cake into a rounded brain shape. Carve small slivers at a time. Carve out a dividing line in the center of the brain where the hemispheres would be divided. Repeat the same process horizontally along the back of the brain. Soak with simple syrup, crumb coat, and chill in the fridge.

What is a Halloween brain cake?

This is a fairly simple fondant customized cake. If designing your own cakes scares you, I assure you this Halloween Brain cake takes less “brain cells” in designing than it actually looks. Below is a pictorial guide that I hope will help you make your very own brain cake.

How do you make a brain out of fondant?

Roll out the fondant into ½-inch thick ropes and arrange them on the cake to look like a brain (PICTURE at 6:18). Use a paintbrush to brush the raspberry blood over the fondant. TaDa!

How to fill a cake with fondant?

6) Take a pinch of fondant and roll them into long lines of 5mm thickness. 7) Remove cake from the fridge and twist and turn your fondant lines randomly around the cake. It doesn’t have to be neat so just go crazy and fill your brain up. 8) Repeat Steps 6-7 until the entire brain is filled.

How long does it take for a cake to bake properly?

Slow-bake until a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean, about 1 hour and 30 minutes. Let the cake cool and then remove it from the bowl. Level the top with a large knife and place the cake, flat side down on a cake plate. Use an offset spatula to frost the cake with a very thin layer of cream cheese frosting.

How do you make a cake step by step?

How to Bake a Cake

  1. Step 1: Prepare Baking Pans.
  2. Step 2: Allow Ingredients to Reach Room Temperature.
  3. Step 3: Preheat the Oven.
  4. Step 4: Stir Together Dry Ingredients.
  5. Step 5: Combine the Butter and Sugar.
  6. Step 6: Add Eggs One at a Time.
  7. Step 7: Alternate Adding Dry and Wet Ingredients.
  8. Step 8: Pour Batter into Pans and Bake.

What is in the brain?

Weighing about 3 pounds in the average adult, the brain is about 60% fat. The remaining 40% is a combination of water, protein, carbohydrates and salts. The brain itself is a not a muscle. It contains blood vessels and nerves, including neurons and glial cells.

How do you make a zombie cake at home?

smear green gel food coloring and some of the black frosting on the cake topper to create a zombie look. separate the creme filling from the cookie shell of the Oreos and crush the remaining cookies. arrange larger broken cookies in a circle around the zombie to suggest that she is rising from her grave.

What is the human brain?

The brain is one of the largest and most complex organs in the human body. It is made up of more than 100 billion nerves that communicate in trillions of connections called synapses. The brain is made up of many specialized areas that work together: The cortex is the outermost layer of brain cells.

Who makes hyper realistic cakes?

Since 2009, Sideserf has made hyper-realistic confections that mimic everything from animals to Converse sneakers to Willie Nelson. “I treat edible materials and cake like I would any other traditional art material,” Sideserf says.

What should a beginner bake?

And here are 18 super easy baking recipes you need to try if you’re a beginner baker.

  • Classic Banana Bread.
  • Sea Salt Chocolate Chunk Cookies.
  • Blueberry Streusel Muffins.
  • Almond Flour Cookies.
  • Flourless Banana Bread Bars.
  • Multiseed Homemade Crackers.
  • Flourless Chocolate Chip Peanut Butter Cookies.
  • Monster Cookie Bars.
  • What are the 7 basic baking ingredients?

    What are the 7 basic baking ingredients? The essential ingredients consists of flour, leaveners, salt, sugar, dairy, fats, extracts, spices & other add-ins such as vanilla extract, and chocolate chips.

    How do you make a cake in 10 steps?

    Bake a Cake in 10 Steps

    1. 01 of 10. The Basics of Baking a Cake. Elaine Lemm.
    2. 02 of 10. Grease and Preheat. ​Elaine Lemm.
    3. 03 of 10. Prepare Your Ingredients. ​Elaine Lemm.
    4. 04 of 10. Whisk the Dry Mix.
    5. 05 of 10. Cream Your Butter and Sugar.
    6. 06 of 10. Add the Eggs.
    7. 07 of 10. It’s Time to Combine.
    8. 08 of 10. Pour Your Batter in Your Pan.

    What is a Halloween brain cake?

    This is a fairly simple fondant customized cake. If designing your own cakes scares you, I assure you this Halloween Brain cake takes less “brain cells” in designing than it actually looks. Below is a pictorial guide that I hope will help you make your very own brain cake.

    How to fill a cake with fondant?

    6) Take a pinch of fondant and roll them into long lines of 5mm thickness. 7) Remove cake from the fridge and twist and turn your fondant lines randomly around the cake. It doesn’t have to be neat so just go crazy and fill your brain up. 8) Repeat Steps 6-7 until the entire brain is filled.

    Step by Step Tutorial on how to make a Halloween Brain Cake

    We’re only a few weeks away from the Halloween holiday.Have you thought about what you’ll serve as a surprise dessert for Halloween or Thanksgiving?If that’s the case, I have an idea that could terrify the living daylights out of a few of you.

    The Halloween Brain Cake, also known as the Bloody Brain.Why would anyone want to experiment with edible brains?It eludes me.When I was looking for inspiration on the internet one day, I came up with the concept of creating a brain that was bathed in blood and could be eaten.

    It was a ″kill two birds with one stone″ situation because I had some leftover red velvet cake from a previous order on hand.This is a rather straightforward fondant-based personalized cake.If the thought of making your own cakes makes you nervous, I can promise you that this Halloween Brain cake requires fewer ″brain cells″ to create than it appears.I’ve included a photo guide to assist you in making your very own brain cake.I hope you find it useful.

    It doesn’t have to be for Halloween; it can be for any other occasion where you want to surprise someone with something horrifyingly horrible but deliciously repulsive and delicious.It’s enough of that…This has gotten completely out of control.1) You’ll need a cake in the shape of a brain for this project.First, I prepared a red velvet cake in a hemisphere baking pan.

    It turned out beautifully (It will be round but its ok because you will be carving out some of the cake to form an oval shape).You can use any of your favorite cake recipes, although ″red cakes″ are a better fit for the theme because they are more festive.2) Because my dome cake was not in the shape of a brain, I carved it with a knife to make it appear more oval.Then, using your favorite buttercream frosting, cover the entire cake with it.You may use jam or any other type of spread.The goal here is to get the fondant to adhere to the cake as much as possible.

    4) Once you have finished icing the cake, place it in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to 1 hour to set the frosting.5) Begin by making the fondant.I make my own marshmallow fondant for the majority of my cakes, but you can also purchase prepared packets (I recommend the Satin Ice Brand since it’s smooth and simple to roll) from any baking supply store or online.Simply start with a white fondant and gradually add Wilton’s Ivory edible gel to get the desired skin tone.

    6) Take a pinch of fondant and roll it into long lines with a thickness of 5mm (see photo).7) Remove the cake from the refrigerator and twist and turn your fondant lines in a random pattern all over the cake surface.It doesn’t have to be neat, so just go nuts and feed your brain with as much information as possible.8) Repeat Steps 6-7 as needed until the entire brain is stuffed with food.

    1. In the centre of the brain, there should be a definite line that divides it into two halves: the left and right brains.
    2. The crimson blood (see recipe below) should be smeared across all of the brain.
    3. If the color is too light, add additional red food coloring or honey to get the desired sheen and luster.
    4. 10) Dip a few tissues or a knife into the blood and set them next to the dish of food.
    5. 11.
    6. After that, you’re ready to serve the brain to your friends and family.
    1. After then, cutting up the Halloween Brain cake is the most enjoyable part of the entire experience!
    2. Enjoy!
    3. 12) Let your imagination go wild with the photos.

    How to get the Red Blood

    (I like this type over the others since it is thick and not watery.) — Wilton’s red food coloring The ingredients are: honey, water, and strawberry jam (optional) Combine all of the ingredients.If you want a darker red, mix in a little dark blue to get it.In order to produce a certain amount of sheen in the cake, honey or jam is used.

    With that, I wish you the best of luck if you decide to bake your own Halloween brain cake this year.

    Other Halloween Treats you might like: 

    Halloween Eyeball Pinata Cake

    Instructions on how to construct this cake are available in this page, with step by step photos. WOW YOUR GUESTS with this stunning piñata cake!

    Halloween Orange Cupcake Pots

    To save time and money, bake these orange cupcakes in their own fruit instead of purchasing or wasting money on cupcake liners. A unique and entertaining method to enjoy your cake while also wowing your guests by demonstrating a new and more imaginative side of yourself is possible!

    Halloween Unicorn Cupcakes

    Cupcakes in a rainbow of colors like Rainbow Unicorn Vanilla Cupcakes or will you be lured to the Dark Side of a delicious dark Chocolate Speculoos Peanut Butter Cupcake with peanut butter frosting? Choose a side and stick with it. You Make the Call! Share the love by pinning my creations to Pinterest or by visiting @Sherbakes on Instagram to see more of my masterpieces.

    This post includes affiliate links for your convenience. For further information, please see my disclosure page.

    Zombie Brain Cake

    The 18th of October, 2016 A crimson velvet cake topped with marshmallow fondant and a luscious raspberry ″blood″ filling. This is a dish from the Nerdy Nummies Cookbook, and it is delicious! This recipe makes one round cake.

    Things you’ll need

    • Red Velvet Cake (or Red Velvet Pudding) Ingredients 4-ounce unsalted butter
    • 2-cups granulated sugar
    • 3 eggs
    • 1-teaspoon vanilla extract
    • 2-cup all-purpose flour
    • 14-cup cocoa powder
    • 12-tablespoon baking soda
    • 12-tablespoon salt
    • 1-cup sour cream
    • 12-cup whole milk
    • 1-teaspoon red gel color
    • 1-teaspoon cream cheese frosting
    • 1-teaspoon red gel color
    • Raspberry-infused blood One and a quarter cups seedless raspberry jam, two teaspoons fresh lemon juice, fourteen cups water, and one teaspoon red gel coloring
    • Fondant made with marshmallows Mini marshmallows (about 10 ounces)
    • 3 teaspoons water
    • 6 cups powdered sugar
    • 14 cup shortening (for greasing your hands)
    • 3 tablespoons water
    • Equipment The following items are required: hand mixer
    • rubber spatula
    • 112-quart ovenproof glass bowl (Pyrex)
    • large mixing bowl
    • medium mixing bowl
    • small mixing bowl
    • hand strainer. The following items are optional: whisk, pastry brush, long serrated cake knife, sheet tray, cake stand, paring knife, small offset spatula.

    Let’s get started!

    Red Velvet Cake:

    1. Preheat the oven to 300 degrees Fahrenheit.
    2. In a medium-sized mixing basin, whisk together the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, and salt until combined.
    3. In a large mixing bowl, using an electric mixer, cream the butter until it is light and fluffy. Add the sugar and continue to beat until the mixture is light and fluffy, 3 to 5 minutes.
    4. In a small mixing dish, combine the eggs and vanilla extract. Beat for 2 minutes on medium speed after pouring in the egg mixture into the butter-sugar combination
    5. To make the sour cream and milk, mix them together in a separate small dish.
    6. Using a low speed, alternately add the flour combination and the sour cream mixture to the butter-egg mixture, beginning and ending with the flour mixture and adding the food coloring with the first addition of liquid each time.
    7. Using a greased, heatproof glass bowl, pour the batter into the bowl until it is two-thirds full. You will have a small amount of batter left over.
    8. Slowly bake for 1 hour and 30 minutes, or until a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean.
    9. Allow the cake to cool completely before removing it from the bowl. With a big knife, level the top of the cake and lay it on a cake plate so that the flat side is down.
    10. The cream cheese frosting should be applied with an offset spatula to create a very thin coating on the cake.

    Raspberry Blood:

    Whisk in a small sauce pan all of the ingredients except the gel color and bring to a boil over medium heat, whisking constantly. Once the water is boiling, add the gel color and stir until fully blended before turning off the heat. Allow for cooling of the mixture.

    Marshmallow Fondant:

    1. In a microwave-safe dish, place the marshmallows and then whisk in enough water to evenly coat the marshmallows
    2. Microwave on high for 30 seconds, then turn off the microwave and mix. Repeat this process two more times, or until the mixture is completely smooth and creamy.
    3. Make a hole in the center of a big dish of powdered sugar by sifting three cups of powdered sugar into it. Pour the melted marshmallow mixture onto the powdered sugar until it is completely covered. Sift the remaining powdered sugar on top of the marshmallows and set aside.
    4. To keep the marshmallows from sticking to your hands, lightly oil your hands. In a separate bowl, knead in the sugar until the fondant has the consistency of soft taffy and is no longer sticky to your hands.

    Time to decorate!

    1. In order to make the cake seem like a brain, roll out the fondant into 12-inch-thick strands and stack them on top of it (see PHOTO AT 6:18)
    2. Using a paintbrush, paint the raspberry blood onto the fondant and you’re finished! If you’re having a Halloween party, this brain cake will be the perfect frightening dessert to serve.

    Introduction: DIY Brain Cake

    Hi! Welcome to the Do It Like a Boss website! We’re going to attempt to bake brain cake today!

    Step 1: Prepare the Red Velvet Cake

    Use one and a half cups of sugar, half cup of unsalted butter, and a quarter cup of vegetable oil to make the red velvet cake. Combine the ingredients until they are fully combined. Combine three eggs and two teaspoons of vanilla essence in a mixing bowl. Repeat the process until the mixture is smooth and creamy.

    Step 2: Prepare the Red Velvet Cake

    Mix in two and a half cups of flour, a quarter cup of cocoa powder, a half teaspoon of salt, and two teaspoons of baking powder until well combined. One cup of milk should have red food coloring added to it before being poured into your mixer. Combine them one again.

    Step 3: Bake the Red Velvet Cake

    After you’ve thoroughly combined them, take your mixing bowl and pour our red velvet cake batter into it. Bake it for ninety minutes at three hundred and thirty degrees.

    Step 4: Prepare the Buttercream Frosting

    Cream one cup of butter until it becomes creamy, which is the base for the buttercream frosting. It takes 5 minutes to complete. After that, carefully add 3 cup of icing sugar and continue to mix them until fluffy. Finally, add 2 tablespoons of milk and thoroughly mix it together.

    See also:  How Long Does Fondant Last On A Cake?

    Step 5: Covering With Frosting

    Take your cake and cut it into the form of a rudimentary brain. Buttercream frosting should be applied on top. Now wait until it has cooled down in the refrigerator.

    Step 6: Give Brain Folds Shape

    In the meantime, prepare your skin color fondant by rolling it into little tubes. Take your cake and place random brain folds on top of it to make it look more realistic.

    Step 7: Bleeding:)

    Let’s go ahead and bleed that new brain! Bloody cherry jam may be used to do this.

    Step 8: Viola!

    The result is a bloddy tasty brain that zombies will go crazy over. The dessert can be served during your Halloween celebration as a last course. Believe me when I say that they will scream like braaaiiiinzzzz.

    Be the First to Share

    Brain Cake: Easy Recipe & Design Made w/ Buttercream

    Making my spider cake last week was so much fun that I decided to make another Halloween-themed dessert to share with you.This recipe for brain cake is equal parts creepy and delectable!It’s prepared with moist red velvet cake layers, pink cream cheese buttercream, and raspberry jam blood as the filling for the cake.

    This design is one of my favorites since it is reasonably simple to produce and does not necessitate the use of any special pans or molds.All of my techniques and tricks for making a brain cake without using a mold or fondant are included here, so strap up and prepare to have a good time!

    Making this Brain Cake: Step-by-Step Tutorial

    Come with me as I lead you through each stage of this brain cake to ensure that it turns out the best it possibly can.

    Step 1: Bake the Red Velvet Cake Layers

    Fill three 8-inch round cake pans with red velvet cake batter and bake until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cakes comes out with a few moist crumbs.If your oven is different from mine, the baking time may differ significantly.Keep an eye on the cake after it has been in the oven for 27 minutes.

    Allow each of the cake layers to cool for 10 minutes in their pans before running a tiny offset spatula around the border.Carefully lift the layers out of their pans and set them on a wire rack to cool completely before serving.Once the cake layers have been allowed to cool completely, level two of them with a serrated knife, leaving one rounded to serve as the cake’s top layer.Assemble the cake layers by stacking them on top of one another and cutting two sides of the cake to form an oval/brain shape.

    Make the top of the cake a little more rounded by cutting it with a tiny, sharp knife.Putting the cake layers in the freezer for around 20 minutes will help if your cake layers are ripping or if you’re having trouble cutting the cake layers properly.It will assist them in maintaining their form more effectively and will make them much simpler to cut.I cut the cake layers after they were stacked and frosted in the video and photo below, but I discovered that trimming them early in the process wastes less frosting and makes the entire process easier.If you’re planning to make these cake layers ahead of time, wrap them in plastic wrap and freeze them now.

    Step 2: Make the Cream Cheese Buttercream Frosting

    While the cake layers are baking and cooling, prepare the cream cheese buttercream frosting, using either an electric hand mixer or a stand mixer to get the desired consistency.If your frosting appears to be overly thick after you’ve combined all of your ingredients, you may thin it down with extra cream (1 tablespoon at a time).Alternatively, if the frosting is too thin, extra powdered sugar can be used (quarter of a cup at a time).

    To find out what consistency you should be searching for when it comes to frosting thickness, check out my post on the topic of frosting consistency.To get the required color and consistency, add a little amount of red food coloring to the frosting and stir thoroughly until the frosting is a light shade of pink and uniformly tinted.To prevent a crust from developing on the pink frosting, cover it with a piece of plastic wrap and leave it aside.

    Step 3: Stack and Crumb Coat the Cake Layers

    • Cake layers should be stacked and frost on a greaseproof cake board or big plate, with a dab of frosting on the first cake layer to assist it adhere to the cake board or plate.
    • Between each cake layer, spread an equal layer of frosting on top of it.
    • Apply a thin layer of frosting around the edge of the cake, making sure to cover all of the cake layers.
    • Smooth the frosting with an offset spatula or a tiny acetate sheet, then chill the cake in the refrigerator (20 minutes) or freezer (5 minutes) until the frosting is stiff to the touch, about 20 minutes.

    Step 4: Pipe Pink Frosting on the Chilled Cake

    • Let’s speak about how to decorate this brain cake, shall we?
    • Place the remaining pink frosting in a large piping bag fitted with a big round tip, such as the Ateco 805, and pipe the design onto the cake.
    • To make the right and left hemispheres of the brain, remove the cake from the fridge or freezer and cut a line down the center of it using an offset spatula or butter knife using an offset spatula or butter knife.
    • Squiggly lines should be piped on either side of the cake to make it seem like a brain.

    Once the cake has been thoroughly coated with frosting, place it in the refrigerator (30 minutes) or freezer (10 minutes) for another 30 minutes or until the frosting is entirely solid to the touch.

    Step 5: Take Things Up a Notch with Raspberry “Blood“

    • Meanwhile, in a small mixing dish, combine the seedless raspberry jam, 3 tablespoons of water, and a splash of red gel food coloring.
    • Set aside while the cake cools.
    • The jam should have a thinner, smoother consistency and be brilliant crimson after whisking it all together.
    • Remove the cake from the refrigerator or freezer and, using a pastry brush, apply a thick layer of the jam mixture over the pink frosting to cover it completely.

    Take special care to get the raspberry jam ″blood″ into all of the nooks and crevices between the frosting squiggles on the cake.After that, put a bit around the base to make the cake appear extra scary, and then enjoy yourself!

    Substitutions and Swaps – Red Velvet Cake Layers

    • This Halloween brain cake calls for a large number of ingredients, and I understand that you may not have all of them on hand. Alternatively, if you have food allergies or limits, I can accommodate you. Some of the adjustments and substitutions that may be made in this cake recipe are listed below. Cake flour is preferred for this recipe, but if you don’t have any cake flour on hand, you may use a gluten-free flour blend. Alternatively, if you are unable to locate cake flour, you may produce your own following this method.
    • The use of granulated sugar is not recommended since lowering the amount of sugar or altering the type of sugar would alter the texture of the cake layers
    • instead, I propose using confectioners’ sugar.
    • Unsalted Butter — If you only have salted butter on hand, you can substitute it in for the unsalted butter in this recipe if you don’t have any other options. Just be sure to leave out the salt that is called for in this cake recipe. You may also substitute vegan butter for the regular butter (and eliminate the salt).
    • Eggs — If you have an egg allergy, you may use flaxseed eggs or an egg replacer
    • however, the texture of the layers will be affected as a result.
    • You may also use full-fat yogurt, sour cream, whole milk, or a dairy-free replacement yogurt or milk (almond, soy, or oat) if you’re allergic to dairy
    • buttermilk is the most common.
    • This recipe calls for vegetable oil, but you may use any flavorless oil you like. Canola or even sunflower oil would be excellent choices

    Substitutions and Swaps – Cream Cheese Buttercream Frosting

    • When using unsalted butter, you can substitute salted butter if you happen to only have salted butter on hand. Just be sure to leave out the salt that is called for in this frosting recipe. You may also use vegan butter for the regular butter (but leave out the salt).
    • Cream cheese — For this recipe, the full-fat variety that comes in a block works best. This recipe may be modified to use more butter in place of the cream cheese if you don’t like for cream cheese frosting.
    • Heavy Cream — If you don’t have heavy cream on hand, whole milk or substitute milk (soy, almond, oat) would work nicely in this frosting recipe.
    • Gel food coloring – If natural food coloring (such as raspberry powder) or liquid food coloring is required, gel food coloring can be utilized.

    Tips for Making the Best Brain Cake:

    • Make careful to measure your flour accurately (spoon into the cup measure, then level) or to use a kitchen scale to weigh your dry ingredients.
    • Use gel food coloring instead of liquid food coloring to prevent distorting the consistency of the icing and cake layers or imparting a bitter flavor.
    • It is easier for components to mix together when they are at room temperature, so make sure to put out any chilly ingredients ahead of time.
    • Make only a few strokes with the cake batter to ensure that all of the ingredients are evenly distributed. This will ensure that the layers of your cake are sensitive and soft.
    • Before constructing the cake, place the cake layers in the freezer for approximately 20 minutes. Trimming, stacking, and frosting are much easier as a result.
    • If necessary, you may make this brain cake vegan or dairy-free. Substitute the buttermilk and heavy cream with your preferred type of dairy-free milk, and replace the butter with vegan butter sticks in place of the regular butter. For the eggs, I recommend using an egg substitute such as this one.
    • Don’t be concerned if your piped frosting isn’t perfectly smooth or if there are some little gaps
    • the frosting will be totally coated with jam and no one will notice.
    • Make cake pops out of the leftover cake trimmings, eat them as a snack with leftover buttercream, or crumble up the layers and sprinkle them on top of ice cream for a delicious dessert! It is possible to keep them at room temperature for up to 3 days in an airtight container.

    Making this Brain Cake in Advance & Storage Tips:

    • Make your cake layers ahead of time and store them in the freezer. It simplifies the procedure by breaking it down into smaller steps
    • you can also prepare your frosting ahead of time or freeze any extra frosting. It may be kept in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks if stored in an airtight container. Alternatively, you may preserve it in the freezer for up to a month. Make sure to give it a thorough stir once it has thawed to restore the consistency back to its smooth state.
    • Cake that has been frosted can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a week. The buttercream seals in all of the moisture, making the cake moist and tasty throughout the day.
    • Use any leftover frosting to cover the sliced piece of the cake to keep it moist if you cut into the cake and have leftover icing. It will keep for up to a week if kept in this manner in the refrigerator.

    Let Me Know What You Think!

    If any of you decide to create this Halloween brain cake, I’d love to hear your thoughts on it! Please let me know by providing a rating in the box below. Please tag me @chelsweets and usechelsweets if you plan to post your fantastic creations on social media so that I may see them!

    Other Recipes You Might Like:

      Monster Cupcakes

    Time required for preparation: 20 minutes Preparation time: 27 minutes 30 minutes of additional time are required. 1 hour and 17 minutes is the total time.

    Instructions

    Red Velvet Cake

    1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit / 175 degrees Celsius. Prepare three 8-inch or three 7-inch cake pans with homemade cake release or nonstick baking spray, then line the pans with parchment paper to prevent sticking.
    2. In a medium-sized mixing bowl, stir together the cake flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, and salt
    3. Set aside.
    4. Using either a hand mixer or a stand mixer, beat together the butter and granulated sugar in a large mixing basin or the bowl of a stand mixer until light and fluffy. Mix on a medium-high speed for 1-2 minutes, or until the mixture lightens in color (about 1-2 minutes). A rubber spatula can be used to scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl as necessary.
    5. Slowly and steadily integrate the eggs until they are entirely absorbed
    6. Combine the buttermilk, oil, red food coloring, vanilla extract, and white vinegar in a mixing bowl until well combined. Mix on a low speed until everything is well incorporated. I understand that the mixture appears to be fractured at this point, but I assure you that after we add the dry ingredients, it will come together.
    7. Slowly incorporate the dry ingredients into the wet components while mixing at a low speed in three batches. Continue to mix until everything is just blended and there are no obvious streaks of cake flour left
    8. Divide the mixture evenly between the prepared pans, then hit the pans on the counter a few times to release any trapped air bubbles that may have formed in the batter during the preparation. Remove the pans from the oven and allow them to cool for 10 minutes before running a tiny offset spatula along the perimeter. Using tongs, carefully lift the layers out of their pans and set them on a wire rack to cool completely
    9. Once the cake layers have been allowed to cool completely, level two of them with a serrated knife, leaving one rounded to serve as the cake’s top layer.
    10. Assemble the cake layers by stacking them on top of one another and cutting two sides of the cake to form an oval/brain shape. Make the top of the cake a little more rounded by cutting it with a tiny, sharp knife. Putting the cake layers in the freezer for around 20 minutes will help if your cake layers are ripping or if you’re having trouble cutting the cake layers properly. It will assist them in maintaining their form more effectively and will make them much simpler to cut. I cut the cake layers after they were stacked and frosted in the video and photo below, but I discovered that trimming them earlier in the process wastes less frosting and makes the entire process easier
    11. see video and photo below.
    12. If you’re preparing them ahead of time, wrap them in plastic wrap and freeze them now.

    Cream Cheese Buttercream Frosting:

    1. Stirring constantly for 30 seconds with a paddle attachment, mix the butter and cream cheese together until smooth and creamy. Instead of cream cheese frosting, you can substitute additional butter for the cream cheese in this frosting recipe if you don’t care for it.
    2. Add in the vanilla and salt and continue to beat on low speed until all of the ingredients are well combined.
    3. Slowly incorporate the powdered sugar and heavy cream into the batter while mixing on a moderate speed. Remove the lid of your mixer and place a kitchen towel over it to prevent powdered sugar clouds from forming in your kitchen. A rubber spatula can be used to scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl as necessary.
    4. Additional cream can be used if the frosting becomes too thick (1 Tbsp at a time).
    5. Pour in extra powdered sugar (a quarter cup at a time) if the frosting is too thin to spread. As soon as the frosting has reached the appropriate consistency, add a small squirt of red food coloring and stir until the frosting is a light shade of pink and uniformly tinted.
    6. A piece of plastic wrap should be placed over the frosting to prevent it from setting into a crust. Remove from consideration
    See also:  How Much Does A Cookie Cake Cost?

    Edible Blood Recipe:

    To make the red gel food coloring, combine 3 tablespoons of water and 1/4 teaspoon red gel food coloring in a small mixing basin. Whisk the ingredients together until the jam has a thin, silky consistency and is a brilliant red color, about 5 minutes. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside.

    Decorating this Brain Cake:

    1. Cake layers should be stacked and frosted on a greaseproof cake board, with a dab of frosting applied to the first cake layer to aid in adhesion to the board. Spread a thin layer of frosting between each cake layer in a uniform thickness.
    2. Apply a thin layer of frosting around the edge of the cake, making sure to cover all of the cake layers. Then chill the cake in the refrigerator (20 minutes) or freezer (5 minutes) until the frosting is hard to the touch
    3. smooth with an offset spatula or tiny acetate sheet.
    4. Place the frosting in a large piping bag fitted with a big round tip, such as an Ateco 805, and pipe the icing onto the cake.
    5. To make the right and left hemispheres of the brain, remove the cake from the fridge or freezer and cut a line down the center of it using an offset spatula or butter knife using an offset spatula or butter knife. Squiggly lines should be piped on either side of the cake to make it seem like a brain. You shouldn’t be concerned if your lines aren’t perfectly straight or if there are a few little gaps between them
    6. the frosting will be totally coated with jam and no one will notice.
    7. Once the cake has been thoroughly coated with frosting, place it in the refrigerator (30 minutes) or freezer (10 minutes) for another 30 minutes or more, or until the frosting is entirely solid to the touch.
    8. Remove the cake from the refrigerator or freezer and, using a pastry brush, apply a thick layer of the jam mixture over the pink frosting to cover it completely. Make certain that the blood gets into all of the nooks and crevices between the frosting squiggles! Afterwards, put a bit around the base to make the cake appear even scarier, and then serve.

    Notes

    My Tips for Making the Best Brain Cake

    When ingredients are at room temperature, they blend together better! Make sure you have all of your chilled components ready to go in advance.

    • Make certain that your cake flour is accurately measured (spoon into the cup measure, then level). Use a kitchen scale to measure your dry ingredients, or even better, a digital scale.
    • Make only a few strokes with the cake batter to ensure that all of the ingredients are evenly distributed. This will guarantee that the layers of your cake are delicate and fluffy.
    • Filling your cake pans with batter requires the use of a scale. By ensuring that each pan contains the same amount of batter, you can ensure that your cake layers bake to the same height and bake more evenly.
    • Be sure to bang the cake pans on the counter before placing them in the oven. This raises any trapped air bubbles in the batter to the surface, which is beneficial.
    • Serrated knife: Use a serrated knife to level your room temperature or thawed cake layers to make them simpler to assemble
    • Before constructing the cake, place the cake layers in the freezer for approximately 20 minutes. trimming, stacking, and frosting them are made considerably simpler as a result of this.
    • Don’t be concerned if your piped frosting isn’t perfectly smooth or if there are some little gaps
    • the frosting will be totally coated with jam and no one will notice.
    • Make cake pops out of the leftover cake trimmings, eat them as a snack with leftover buttercream, or crumble up the layers and sprinkle them on top of ice cream for a delicious dessert! It is possible to keep them at room temperature for up to 3 days in an airtight container.

    Making this Brain Cake in Advance & Storage Tips

    • Make your cake layers ahead of time and store them in the freezer. It simplifies the process by breaking it down and making it more approachable.
    • Make your frosting ahead of time, or preserve any extra frosting for a later day! Storage in the refrigerator for up to a month in an airtight container is recommended.
    • In addition, this frosting may be kept in the freezer for up to 3 months. Don’t forget to give it a good stir once it has thawed to ensure that the mixture is nice and smooth again.
    • A frosted cake can keep for up to a week in the refrigerator and up to a month in the freezer. The buttercream holds in the moisture, allowing the cake to remain moist and tasty throughout the day.

    Nutrition Information

    Yield

    Serving Size

    1 Calories per serving (per serving): 611 31 g of total fat 15 g of saturated fat 0 g of Trans Fatty Acids 14 g of unsaturated fat Cholesterol is 88 milligrams. 333 milligrams of sodium 81 g of carbohydrates 1 gram of fiber 65 g of sugar 4 g of protein

    Here’s How to Make the Best Layer Cake of Your Life

    • The cake is light and fluffy, and it is topped with icing.
    • Whether it’s a basic vanilla cake or a decadent chocolate treat, a delightfully moist cake is a must-have centerpiece for every special occasion, no matter what the occasion.
    • Many of our most popular cake recipes begin with the same technique: creaming butter or shortening with sugar until it’s light and fluffy.
    • Creamed cakes are sometimes referred to as such because the fat and sugar are creamed together in the preparation of the cake.

    Our Test Kitchen will teach you how to make a homemade cake that’s so good that everyone will think you bought it from a fancy bakery.We’ll use tried-and-true methods from our Test Kitchen to teach you how to make a homemade cake that’s so good that everyone will think you bought it from a fancy bakery.While it will take some time, none of the processes involved in baking a cake are very difficult, as you will discover in the next section.

    How to Bake a Cake

    • Find out how to make the recipe.
    • You must first pick a cake recipe before you can forward with the rest of the process.
    • Alternatively, you may go for a more elaborate recipe, such as a chocolate devil’s food cake or a brilliant red velvet cake recipe, to make your cake more visually appealing to your guests.
    • If you’re not a fan of the typical frostings, a German chocolate cake can be a good alternative.

    In addition, we offer a few birthday cake recipes for special events like birthdays.Almost any cake can be made with this recipe, and these instructions will guide you through the process of making any of them.However, angel food, pound cakes, sponge cakes, and chiffon cakes require different techniques, so be sure to read about those separately if you’re making one of those cakes.

    Step 1: Prepare Baking Pans

    • Anyone who bakes a cake does not want it to cling to the pan, thus it is critical to prepare the pans before putting in the batter.
    • With the exception of angel food and chiffon cakes, most recipes ask for greasing and flouring the pan or lining the pan with waxed or parchment paper before baking the cake or pie.
    • While it comes to determining what sort of baking pan to use, our Test Kitchen loves glossy pans since they provide a more golden look when baking.
    • In order to avoid overbrowning, adjust the oven temperature by 25°F if you are using a dark or dull-finish pan and check doneness 3 to 5 minutes earlier than normal.

    Step 2: Allow Ingredients to Reach Room Temperature

    • Many cake recipes call for cake components such as eggs and butter to be allowed to come to room temperature before being used.
    • Because of this, the butter will combine more readily with the other ingredients, and the eggs will result in a more substantial cake volume.
    • (It is not recommended to leave the eggs at room temperature for longer than the period stated in the recipe for food safety concerns.) Test Kitchen Tip: Never use melted butter in a recipe that calls for softened butter instead.
    • It will have a negative impact on the cake’s texture.

    Step 3: Preheat the Oven

    • It is possible for a cake to bake too rapidly and develop tunnels and cracks, while baking too slowly might result in a cake that is gritty.
    • Allow your oven to warm for at least 10 minutes before beginning, and check the temperature using an oven thermometer ($7 at Target) to ensure it reaches the right temperature.
    • Using black cake pans will need you to lower the oven temperature by 25 degrees Fahrenheit from the one specified in your recipe.

    Step 4: Stir Together Dry Ingredients

    • Flour, baking powder and/or baking soda, and salt are some of the most common dry ingredients used in baking.
    • Rather than adding each dry ingredient to the batter one at a time, whisk ($6, Walmart) them together in a separate bowl first.
    • Using this method ensures that the components are evenly dispersed throughout the mixture.
    • someone who is preparing a dessert using butter Photograph courtesy of Kritsada Panichgul

    Step 5: Combine the Butter and Sugar

    • Do you want to know how to produce a cake that has a light, airy crumb? The most crucial step is to cream the butter and sugar together. Here’s how it’s done: Using an electric mixer ($23, Target), whip the butter for 30 seconds on a medium to high speed until it is fluffy. Generally, a stand mixer with a medium speed is required for this phase, whereas a hand mixer with a greater speed is required.
    • On medium speed, beat in the sugar (and vanilla extract, if the recipe asks for it) until the mixture has a light, fluffy texture and is completely incorporated. This will take around 3 to 5 minutes. (DO NOT chop this section short.) While pounding, scrape the sides of the bowl occasionally. As the butter and sugar are blended, little bubbles will be formed, which will give your cake its beautiful, light, and fluffy texture.

    Step 6: Add Eggs One at a Time

    • Add the eggs (or egg whites) one at a time, mixing well after each addition.
    • Their protein helps to keep the texture of the product by creating structure around air bubbles.
    • Test Kitchen Tip: Separate the eggs into custard cups or small bowls before mixing them together.
    • If you find shell fragments in your batter, you may quickly fish them out of the cup rather than trying to get them out of the batter.

    Step 7: Alternate Adding Dry and Wet Ingredients

    • Beat on low speed after each addition until the flour mixture and milk (or other liquid indicated in the recipe) are fully incorporated.
    • Alternate between adding part of the flour mixture and some of the milk (or other liquid specified in the recipe).
    • The flour mixture should be used to start and finish the recipe.
    • This is due to the fact that when liquid is added to flour, gluten begins to develop.

    Too much gluten results in a difficult cake, so be careful to start and finish with flour, and avoid overmixing after the liquid has been included.Warning: Do not overmix at this point or you may end up with elongated, uneven holes in your completed cake.Test Kitchen Tip: person responsible for spreading cake batter Photograph courtesy of Kritsada Panichgul

    Step 8: Pour Batter into Pans and Bake

    Using a spatula, evenly distribute the batter across the baking pans. Spread the batter in a uniform layer using an offset spatula ($9, Bed Bath & Beyond) once it has been chilled. Make careful to distribute it all the way to the edge of the pan. Make sure to follow the guidelines on the recipe while baking your cake.

    Step 9: Check Cake for Doneness

    • No one likes to eat a dry cake, which is what happens when it is overbaked.
    • Start testing the cake for doneness after the recipe’s specified minimum baking time has passed, and resist opening the oven door until it is time to avoid letting the heat escape until it is time.
    • Insert a wooden toothpick towards the middle of a creamed cake to keep it from falling apart.
    • If the pick comes out clean (with only a crumb or two stuck to it), the cake has finished baking.

    The cake should be baked for a few minutes longer if there is any wet batter on it.A new toothpick should be used to test it in a different area.Photograph courtesy of Kritsada Panichgul

    Step 10: Cool the Cake

    • Allow the cakes to cool in their pans on a wire rack ($15, Walmart) for a maximum of 10 minutes before serving.
    • Using a knife, carefully run it over the edges of the cake to release it from the pan sides before removing it from the pans.
    • Placing a wire rack on top of the cake and inverting the pan will help to prevent cracking.
    • Using tongs, carefully lift the pan off the cake, being careful not to break the cake’s edges.

    If you used waxed or parchment paper to wrap your cake, gently take the paper away from it.Allow for thorough cooling of the cake (about 1 hour).This is an important step in allowing the cake to firm up and become less prone to breaking apart while being frosted.As an added bonus, it prevents the frosting from melting immediately after application!person responsible for icing the cake and assembling the layers Get the recipe for our Buttercream Frosting.

    Step 11: Assemble the Cake

    • Brush the cake layers with a pastry brush ($10, Williams Sonoma) before assembling them to prevent crumbs from getting into the icing.
    • 12 cup of frosting should be spread over the first layer, and the second layer should be carefully placed on top.
    • Continue until all of the layers have been piled.
    • Test Kitchen Tip: To generously fill and frost a two-layer 9-inch cake, it needs around 212 to 3 cups of icing.

    Plan on using 312 to 4 cups of cake batter for a three-layer cake.

    Step 12: Add the First Coat of Frosting

    • The crumb coat is the key to mastering the art of frosting a layer cake successfully.
    • For this, apply a very thin coating of frosting to the edges and top of the cake and distribute it evenly.
    • While this first coat does not have to be immaculate, it serves an important purpose in keeping crumbs out of the frosting.
    • Allow the cake to rest for 30 minutes to allow the icing to set.
    See also:  How To Make A Cake Using Pancake Mix?

    Test Kitchen Tip: Use small pieces of waxed paper to wrap around and beneath the initial cake layer when using a pedestal ($13, Walmart) or cake plate to make cleanup easier.

    Step 15: Frost and Decorate

    • Spread the remaining frosting generously over the top and edges of the cake, swirling it in as you go, using an offset spatula or table knife.
    • Afterwards, go back and apply more swirls if desired until the cake is thoroughly coated.
    • Serve the cake within 2 hours, or store it in the refrigerator.
    • Having learned how to build a cake from scratch, you may continue to hone your cake decorating abilities at home by experimenting with different colors of frosting, piping techniques, and finishing touches.

    For additional cake inspiration, here are some simple and elegant cake recipes to get you started on your next baking project.

    What is the brain?

    The brain is a complicated organ that governs every activity in our body, including cognition, memory, emotion, touch, motor skills, vision, respiration, temperature, hunger, and every process that involves our senses. The central nervous system, often known as the CNS, is comprised of the brain and the spinal cord that extends from it.

    What is the brain made of?

    The average adult’s brain weighs around 3 pounds and is composed primarily of fat (60 percent). In addition to water, protein, carbs, and salts make up the remaining 40% of the body’s weight. The brain is not a muscle in and of itself. It is made up of blood vessels and nerves, as well as neurons and glial cells, among other things.

    What is the gray matter and white matter?

    • Gray matter and white matter are two separate parts of the central nervous system that function independently of one another.
    • Gray matter refers to the darker, outer region of the brain, whereas white matter refers to the lighter, inner component that lies beneath the gray matter.
    • In the spinal cord, however, the sequence is reversed: the white matter is located on the exterior, while the gray matter is located within the cord.
    • Neurons somas (the circular core cell bodies) make up the majority of gray matter, while axons (the long stems that connect neurons together) and myelin (the protective sheath around them) make up the majority of white matter (a protective coating).

    This is due to the fact that the two neuron portions have a different makeup and so appear as distinct hues on some scans.Each zone performs a distinct function in the overall scheme.In the neurological system, gray matter is largely responsible for the processing and interpretation of information, whereas white matter is responsible for transmitting that information to other regions of the body.

    How does the brain work?

    • The brain communicates with the rest of the body by sending and receiving chemical and electrical messages.
    • Your brain analyzes the signals that regulate the many processes that it is exposed to.
    • Examples include some that make you feel weary, and others that make you experience discomfort.
    • There are certain signals that remain within the brain, while others are sent via the spine and over the body’s extensive network of nerves to reach distant extremities.

    The central nervous system relies on billions of neurons to do this task (nerve cells).

    Main Parts of the Brain and Their Functions

    The cerebrum, brainstem, and cerebellum are the three major divisions of the brain at the most fundamental level.

    Cerebrum

    • It is composed of gray matter (the cerebral cortex) in the periphery and white matter in the core of the cerebrum (front of brain).
    • The cerebrum is the biggest region of the brain and is responsible for initiating and coordinating movement as well as temperature regulation.
    • In addition to speech, judgment, thinking and reasoning, problem-solving, and learning, other parts of the cerebrum are responsible for other functions.
    • Other functions are associated with the senses of vision, hearing, touch, and other sensations.

    Cerebral Cortex

    • The term ″cortex″ comes from the Latin word for ″bark,″ and it refers to the gray matter that covers the outside of the cerebrum.
    • Because of its folds, the cortex has a high surface area and weighs approximately half of the total weight of the brain.
    • The cerebral cortex is split into two parts, known as hemispheres, which are responsible for different functions.
    • Several folds and ridges (gyri) may be seen on it (sulci).

    It is at this point that the two halves come together, creating a huge, deep fissure (the interhemispheric fissure, also known as the medial longitudinal fissure) that extends from the front of the head to the back.Control of the left side of the body is exercised by the right hemisphere, while the right half is exercised by the left hemisphere.The corpus callosum, a huge, C-shaped structure of white matter and nerve pathways that connects the two halves of the brain, allows the two sides to interact with one another.The corpus callosum is a structure located in the middle of the cerebral cortex.

    Brainstem

    • The brainstem (middle of the brain) is the structure that links the cerebrum to the spinal column. The midbrain, the pons, and the medulla are all components of the brainstem. Midbrain. The midbrain (also known as the mesencephalon) is a very complex structure that contains a variety of distinct neuron clusters (nuclei and colliculi), neural pathways, and other structures. These characteristics make it easier to do a variety of tasks, from listening and moving to calculating answers and responding to environmental changes. This region also comprises the substantia nigra, which is damaged by Parkinson’s disease and has a high concentration of dopaminergic neurons as well as a portion of the basal ganglia (which controls movement and coordination)
    • Pons. The pons is the site of origin for four of the twelve cranial nerves, which are responsible for a variety of functions such as tear formation, chewing, blinking, concentrating eyesight, balance, hearing, and facial expression, among others. The pons, which derives its name from the Latin word for ″bridge,″ serves as a link between the midbrain and the medulla
    • Medulla The medulla is located at the base of the brainstem, and it is here that the brain joins the spinal cord. The medulla is very necessary for living. The medulla’s functions govern a wide range of body operations, including heart rhythm, respiration, blood flow, and levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood. This part of the brain causes reflexive behaviors such as coughing, sneezing and swallowing
    • it is also responsible for the production of saliva.

    At humans, the spinal cord runs from the bottom of the medulla and through a big aperture in the bottom of the skull to the rest of the body. The spinal cord, which is supported by the vertebrae, is responsible for transmitting and receiving information between the brain and the rest of the body.

    Cerebellum

    • This little region of the brain is positioned in the rear of the head, below the temporal and occipital lobes, and just above the brainstem.
    • It is known as the cerebellum (or ″little brain″ in some circles).
    • It is divided into two hemispheres, just like the cerebral cortex.
    • The outside portion is made up of neurons, while the inner section is in communication with the rest of the brain.

    Its primary job is to coordinate voluntary muscle movements and to maintain proper posture, balance, and equilibrium in the body.New research is looking into the cerebellum’s responsibilities in thinking, emotions, and social behavior, as well as its likely connection in addiction, autism, and schizophrenia, among other things.

    Brain Coverings: Meninges

    • The meninges, which are three layers of protective covering that surround the brain and spinal cord, protect the brain and spinal cord. The dura mater, which is the outermost layer, is thick and durable. It is composed of two layers: Dura mater is divided into two layers: the periosteal layer that borders the inside of the skull (cranium) and the meningeal layer that lies underneath it. The arachnoid mater is a thin, weblike layer of connective tissue that does not contain nerves or blood vessels, but allows for the passage of veins and arteries that supply blood flow to the brain
    • the spaces between the layers allow for the passage of veins and arteries that supply blood flow to the brain
    • The cerebrospinal fluid, sometimes known as CSF, is found underneath the arachnoid mater. In addition to serving as a cushion for the whole central nervous system (including the brain and spinal cord), this fluid flows continuously around these tissues to eliminate contaminants.
    • Known as the pia mater, the pia mater is a thin membrane that wraps the surface of the brain and molds to its shape. A large number of veins and arteries go through the pia mater.

    Lobes of the Brain and What They Control

    • Each hemisphere (part of the cerebrum) is divided into four regions, which are referred to as lobes: the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital. Each lobe is responsible for controlling a specific function. A lobe in the frontal lobe. The frontal lobe of the brain is the biggest lobe of the brain and is located in the front of the head. It is involved in personality traits, decision-making, and movement. Parts of the frontal lobe are frequently involved in the recognition of smells. The frontal lobe contains Broca’s region, which is related with speaking capacity
    • the parietal lobe is located in the middle of the brain. The parietal lobe, located in the center of the brain, aids in the identification of things as well as the understanding of spatial connections (when one’s body is compared to items in the environment). Aside from this, the parietal lobe is involved in the interpretation of pain and touch in the body. The parietal lobe contains Wernicke’s region, which aids in the understanding of spoken language by the brain
    • the occipital lobe is located in the frontal lobe. The occipital lobe is a region of the brain located in the back of the head that is involved in vision
    • it is also known as the temporal lobe. The temporal lobes, located on the sides of the brain, are responsible for short-term memory, speech, musical rhythm, and some degree of scent identification.

    Deeper Structures Within the Brain

    Pituitary Gland

    • The pituitary gland, which is sometimes referred to as the ″master gland,″ is a pea-sized organ located deep within the brain, behind the bridge of the nose.
    • The pituitary gland regulates the function of other glands in the body, including the thyroid, adrenals, ovaries, and testicles, by controlling the flow of hormones from these organs.
    • Using its stalk and blood supply, it receives chemical signals from the hypothalamus and processes them.

    Hypothalamus

    The hypothalamus is a brain structure that sits above the pituitary gland and communicates with it through chemical messengers that regulate its activity. It plays a function in the regulation of body temperature, the synchronization of sleep cycles, the regulation of hunger and thirst, and the regulation of some elements of memory and emotion.

    Amygdala

    Each hemisphere of the brain has an amygdala, which is a little almond-shaped structure that is placed under each half (hemisphere). They are part of the limbic system and are responsible for mood and memory regulation as well as the reward system, stress, and the ″fight or flight″ reaction that occurs when someone detects a threat.

    Hippocampus

    • The hippocampus is a curving seahorse-shaped organ located on the underside of each temporal lobe.
    • It is a component of a larger structure known as the hippocampal formation, which is located on the underside of each temporal lobe.
    • It aids in the memory, learning, navigation, and awareness of spatial relationships.
    • Because it gets information from the cerebral cortex, it is thought to be involved in Alzheimer’s disease.

    Pineal Gland

    The pineal gland is positioned deep within the brain and is connected to the third ventricle at the apex of the gland by a stalk. It is the pineal gland that responds to light and dark and secretes melatonin, which is responsible for regulating our circadian rhythms and sleep-wake cycle.

    Ventricles and Cerebrospinal Fluid

    • Four open regions with routes connecting them are located deep within the brain.
    • These openings also provide for access to the central spinal canal and a region underneath the arachnoid layer of the meninges.
    • The ventricles produce cerebrospinal fluid, often known as CSF, which is a watery fluid that flows in and around the ventricles and the spinal cord, as well as between the meninges of the brain and spinal cord.
    • Circulating spinal fluid (CSF) surrounds and cushions the spinal cord and brain, as well as washing away waste and pollutants while delivering nutrients.

    Blood Supply to the Brain

    • The vertebral arteries and the carotid arteries are the two sets of blood vessels that carry blood and oxygen to the brain, respectively.
    • The external carotid arteries run along the sides of your neck and are the location where you may feel your pulse when you press your fingertips against the skin in that area.
    • A group of arteries called the internal carotid arteries branch out from inside the skull and supply blood to the front section of the brain.
    • Once within the skull, the vertebral arteries continue their journey up and around the spine until they come together at the brainstem to create the basilar artery, which feeds blood to the lower and middle sections of the brain.

    Located towards the bottom of the brain, the circle of Willis is a loop of blood vessels that links major arteries.It is responsible for transporting blood from the front to rear of the brain and facilitating communication between the arterial systems.

    Cranial Nerves

    • The cranium (the dome of the skull) contains 12 nerves, which are collectively referred to as cranial nerves: The olfactory nerve is the first of the cranial nerves, and it is responsible for your sense of smell.
    • The optic nerve is the second cranial nerve, and it is responsible for vision.
    • Cranial nerve 3: The oculomotor nerve, which governs pupil response and other movements of the eye, originates in the brainstem at the point where the midbrain joins the pons.
    • The trochlear nerve, which is located on the fourth cranial nerve, is responsible for controlling the muscles of the eye. It arises from the midbrain portion of the brainstem at the rear of the midbrain.
    • A cranial nerve with sensory and motor functions, the trigeminal nerve is the biggest and most complicated of the cranial nerves. It is comprised of both sensory and motor fibers. It comes from the pons and is responsible for transmitting feeling from the scalp to the brain. It also permits the function of the chewing muscles, among other things
    • it originates in the pons and is responsible for transmitting sensation from the teeth to the brain.
    • The abducens nerve, which is part of the sixth cranial nerve, provides innervation to some of the muscles of the eye.
    • The facial nerve (cranial nerve 7) is responsible for facial movement, taste, glandular function, and other activities.
    • The vestibulocochlear nerve, which is located on the eighth cranial nerve, is responsible for balance and hearing.
    • The glossopharyngeal nerve, which is

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