How Does Tea Cake Die?

Tea Cake becomes deranged and pulls a gun on his wife. He and Janie end up facing off, with guns pointed at each other. Tea Cake is driven by the disease within him, and Janie shoots out of self-defense. He dies in her arms—biting her arm—and Janie mourns his death.
Tea Cake dies from rabies as a result of saving Janie’s life in the flood.

What happens to tea cake in their eyes were watching God?

Tea Cake’s death at the end of Their Eyes Were Watching God is one of the saddest literary moments that I have ever read. It is sad because he is not even given the noble death that he deserves. He was the one that finally opened Janie’s eyes to a world that she could come to love and respect.

What is the significance of Tea Cake’s death in rabies?

Rabies is a deadly disease that causes insanity and erratic and violent behavior, so her killing of Tea Cake is an act of self defense and a kind mercy killing. In the book, Tea Cake is bitten by a rabid dog while

Why does Tea Cake have to die?

Why does Janie kill Tea Cake? Janie kills Tea Cake to save her own life. A few weeks before, Tea Cake was bitten while rescuing Janie from an angry dog during the hurricane. Tea Cake gets sick, but by the time a doctor sees him and recognizes that the dog has infected Tea Cake with rabies, it is too late.

What happens after Tea Cake dies?

Tea Cake dies in her arms, still hateful and biting down on Janie’s forearm. She weeps over his body and silently thanks him for giving her the chance to love. The same day, Janie is put on trial for killing Tea Cake. The entire black community is set against her; they feel like she has betrayed Tea Cake.

Did Tea Cake have to die?

If this had been the Janie from the beginning of the novel, she would not have handled such a heavy burden with the same level of maturity that we see in her after having known Tea Cake. That in itself is why Tea Cake had to die. Hurston had to show readers that Janie could now handle the stresses of life on her own.

Why did Zora Neale Hurston kill Tea Cake?

Although Tea Cake means everything to her, she is able to kill him to save herself. Her relationship with him has brought her along the path of enlightenment, and now that she has achieved the horizon, she is strong enough to live on her own.

What happens to Tea Cake during the flood?

Tea Cake dives to the rescue and wrestles in the water with the beast, who bites him on the cheek before he stabs it to death.

Does Janie die of rabies?

After Janie has evidently contracted rabies and done nothing to save her life, she says, “If you can see de light at daybreak, you don’t keer if you die at dusk” (236). When thinking of the dog that bit Tea Cake, she says, “That big old dawg… had killed her…” (263).

What did the doctor tell Janie after he examined Tea Cake?

What did the doctor tell Janie after he examined tea-cake? He said tea-cake had rabies. And that he had almost no chance to recover.

What does Janie do after Tea Cake falls dead on her?

What does Janie do after Tea Cake falls dead on her? Janie thanks him for giving her the chance to love somebody.

How did Dr Simmons testify?

Simmons gives a testimony in defense of Janie after she is called to court, telling the jury that Tea Cake was dangerous and Janie was right to kill him in self-defense. Get the entire Their Eyes Were Watching God LitChart as a printable PDF.

What happened just before Tea Cake died?

Janie and Tea Cake shot at the same time, and Janie shot and killed Tea Cake. Janie held Tea Cake in her arms and wept and silently thanked him for the time they had together. Tea Cake bit her on the arm just before he died.

What happened between Tea Cake and Nunkie?

Janie rushes over and finds them play-wrestling on the ground. Tea Cake explains that Nunkie stole his work tickets and coquettishly made him tussle for them. Nunkie flees, and when the couple returns home, Janie tries to beat Tea Cake. But he holds her off, and her wild anger transforms into wild passion.

What is Tea Cake’s diagnosis?

Tea Cake’s case of rabies is an extension of the force of nature that victimized him and Janie (and other humans) during the hurricane. After contracting the disease, Tea Cake loses his physical strength, and, by extension, his sense of command over himself, Janie, and the rest of the world.

How is Tea Cake different from Joe and Logan?

Another characteristic that distinguishes Tea Cake from Janie’s previous husbands is his willingness to both talk and listen. These were the most fundamental flaws in Logan and Joe—Logan didn’t express himself, and Joe wouldn’t listen to Janie.

What is Tea Cake’s real name?

Vergible Woods, known as Tea Cake, is the third husband of Janie Crawford, the protagonist of Zora Neale Hurston’s novel Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937).

How did Logan treat Janie?

Logan Killicks – Logan is Janie’s first husband, a product of an arranged marriage by Janie’s grandmother (Nanny). Logan seemed to be an excellent husband for Janie because he owned his own property and was well-known and respected throughout the community. Logan, however, treated Janie more as a slave than a wife and

What is the significance of Tea Cake’s death in rabies?

Rabies is a deadly disease that causes insanity and erratic and violent behavior, so her killing of Tea Cake is an act of self defense and a kind mercy killing. In the book, Tea Cake is bitten by a rabid dog while

What happens to tea cake in their eyes were watching God?

Tea Cake’s death at the end of Their Eyes Were Watching God is one of the saddest literary moments that I have ever read. It is sad because he is not even given the noble death that he deserves. He was the one that finally opened Janie’s eyes to a world that she could come to love and respect.

What happens to tea cake in the gunfight?

While Janie is waiting with Tea Cake, however, he grows worse. Janie discovers that Tea Cake has placed a loaded revolver under his pillow, and she takes the precaution of loading the rifle and stashing it behind the stove. When Tea Cake, in a fit of jealous madness, pulls the gun on Janie and tries to shoot her, she grabs the rifle and kills him.

who is Tea Cake?

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Their Eyes Were Watching God

who is Tea Cake?

Answers 4
  • Fill in the blanks with your best answer Answered by iris b344286 at 12:40 p.m.
  • on November 5, 2020.
  • Tea Cake is Janie’s third spouse and the father of her three children.
  • In terms of age, he is twelve years younger than Janie.
  • Janie learns how to love from Tea Cake, as well as about her cultural background, how to live life in a more natural way, and how to discover ways to have pleasure just being alive.

Tea Cake is a gambler and a musician who enjoys having a good time.He is lively, daring, and impulsive.Despite the fact that he is not wealthy, he demonstrates to Janie that he can always find money when they are in need, and they are able to survive solely on his earnings.Tea Cake, like Joe Starks, is a natural leader, but he earns the affection and trust of others just by listening to them, laughing at their stories and jokes, and playing guitar for them.In the flood, Tea Cake contracts rabies as a result of saving Janie’s life with his own hands.

  1. As a result, he succumbs to rabies.
  2. That’s a real shame.
  3. Aslan responded on November 5, 2020 at 12:31 p.m.
  4. Tea Cake is a type of cake that is baked in a teapot (Vergible Woods) Tea Cake is Janie’s third spouse and the father of her three children.
  1. In terms of age, he is twelve years younger than Janie.
  2. Janie learns how to love from Tea Cake, as well as about her cultural background, how to live life in a more natural way, and how to discover ways to have pleasure just being alive.
  3. Tea Cake is a gambler and a musician who enjoys having a good time.
  4. He is lively, daring, and impulsive.
  5. Despite the fact that he is not wealthy, he demonstrates to Janie that he can always find money when they are in need, and they are able to survive solely on his earnings.
  6. Tea Cake, like Joe Starks, is a natural leader, but he earns the affection and trust of others just by listening to them, laughing at their stories and jokes, and playing guitar for them.
  • In the flood, Tea Cake contracts rabies as a result of saving Janie’s life with his own hands.
Source(s)
  • Answered by iris b344286 at 132:39 UTC on November 5, 2010.
  • Tea Cake succumbs to rabies?
  • ralph h348724 responded on 12/4/2013 7:30 PM to your question.
  • Tea Cake is a type of cake that is baked in a teapot (Vergible Woods) Tea Cake is Janie’s third spouse and the father of her three children.
  • In terms of age, he is twelve years younger than Janie.

Janie learns how to love from Tea Cake, as well as about her cultural background, how to live life in a more natural way, and how to discover ways to have pleasure just being alive.Tea Cake is a gambler and a musician who enjoys having a good time.He is lively, daring, and impulsive.Despite the fact that he is not wealthy, he demonstrates to Janie that he can always find money when they are in need, and they are able to survive solely on his earnings.Tea Cake, like Joe Starks, is a natural leader, but he earns the affection and trust of others just by listening to them, laughing at their stories and jokes, and playing guitar for them.

  1. In the flood, Tea Cake contracts rabies as a result of saving Janie’s life with his own hands.

Why Tea Cake Had to Die

  • I have to say that Tea Cake’s death at the conclusion of Their Eyes Were Watching God is one of the most heartbreaking literary scenes I have ever encountered.
  • It’s a shame that he isn’t even given the honorable death that he so well deserves.
  • He was the one who, at long last, allowed Janie to see the world in a way that she could grow to appreciate and respect.
  • He was her hero, yet he is not handled as a hero should be honored in the aftermath of a heroic death.
  • As a result of a rabies bite received from a stray dog that was caught up in the hurricane, he is driven to insane delirium.

It is as a result of this that Janie is obliged to kill the man she loves in order to relieve him of his rabies-induced anguish.Because Janie is capable of finding pleasure after such a tragic event, it tells much about her perseverance and character.Of course, the wounds from that moment will definitely remain with her for the rest of her days, but she now possesses the mental fortitude to bear those scars on an equal footing with the rest of the world.We can be certain that if this had been the Janie we met at the beginning of the story, she would not have dealt with such a tremendous weight with the maturity that we see in her after getting to know Tea Cake.Tea Cake had to be put to death for this reason alone.

  1. Hurston needed to demonstrate to her readers that Janie was now capable of dealing with the hardships of life on her own.
  2. With Tea Cake still in the scene, we’d never be able to tell whether Janie was strong in and of herself or if she was strong because Tea Cake was protecting her.

Why did Janie kill Tea Cake?

Tea Cake is killed by Janie because he was infected with rabies. Rabies is a fatal illness that causes insanity as well as unpredictable and violent behavior, therefore her death of Tea Cake was an act of self-defense as well as a compassionate mercy killing on Tea Cake’s part. Tea Cake gets bitten by a rabid dog throughout the course of the novel.

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  • Tea Cake is killed by Janie because he was infected with rabies.

Rabies is a fatal illness that causes insanity as well as unpredictable and violent behavior, therefore her death of Tea Cake was an act of self-defense as well as a compassionate mercy killing on Tea Cake’s part.In the book, Tea Cake gets attacked by a rabid dog while attempting to save Janie from a cyclone in which she is trapped.After several months, the sickness has progressed to the point where Tea Cake’s symptoms are impossible to misinterpret.Calling Dr.Simmons results in his telling Janie that Tea Cake has rabies and would very certainly die, but he agrees to attempt to obtain a vaccine that could save her son’s life.

  1. However, while Janie is waiting with Tea Cake, he continues to deteriorate.
  2. As soon as Janie realizes that Tea Cake has hidden a loaded revolver beneath his pillow, she immediately loads the rifle and places it behind the stove as a safety measure.
  3. In a fit of jealous rage, Tea Cake draws his gun on Janie and attempts to shoot her, Janie takes the rifle and dispatches him.
  4. Janie testified at her trial that Tea Cake couldn’t return to himself until he had gotten rid of the angry dog that had taken up residence in him, and that he couldn’t get rid of the dog and survive.
  1. It was necessary for him to die in order to get rid of the dog.
  2. She, on the other hand, had no intention of killing him.
  3. It indicates that a guy is up against a difficult game when he must die in order to win.
  4. It may be argued that Janie’s affection for Tea Cake drove her to shoot him.
  5. It was the only option she had left if she wanted to get her husband back.

Vergible ″Tea Cake″ Woods Timeline in Their Eyes Were Watching God

  • Janie meets Tea Cake roughly eight months after Joe’s death, and the two hit it off right away. A casual and laughing demeanor, as well as an apparent contempt for social status, is something Janie has never seen before in any man before. He has no qualms about hanging around with blue-collar people, and this makes Janie feel at ease in their company
  • The way he pursues Janie is slowly and intermittently, showing up at random and inviting her to do something adventurous with him (such as fishing by night) then leaving for many days at a time.
  • The story progresses as Janie sells the business and moves to Jacksonville, where she is engaged to marry Tea Cake. After their marriage is consummated, Janie experiences her first fright. She awakens one morning to discover that Tea Cake has vanished, as well as her hidden $200 hoard. Janie is concerned that she has made a mistake in her assessment of Tea Cake’s personality. Tea Cake, on the other hand, returns late that night and informs her of the entire truth. He did, in fact, take her money, but it was not out of contempt for her. He’d just never had so much money in his life before, and he wanted to celebrate by throwing a big party for all his friends. So he did, and he spent the entire sum of money. In his own words, he wanted to go back and fetch Janie so that they could go out and have fun together, but he was afraid she wouldn’t want to mix with the commoners. In exchange for forgiveness, Janie promises Tea Cake that she’ll accompany him wherever he goes
  • Tea Cake leaves to win back Janie’s $200 through gaming. He succeeds, and even makes a profit, but not without paying a price in the process. The next year, Tea Cake is wounded by a man who accuses him of cheating at dice
  • he heals and, with his wife Janie, they relocate to the Everglades, where they find employment in the bean fields. Janie is in a good mood. She works in the fields with Tea Cake and is given the freedom to play, dance, and chat with her neighbors as much as she likes
  • as a result, Janie learns what it’s like to be envious. Tea Cake indulges in way too many sexual encounters with a bubbly younger girl named Nunkie. When Tea Cake and Nunkie go missing in the same day, Janie discovers them together in the cane fields, having gotten a little too violent with their play-fighting. She drives Nunkie away, and Tea Cake returns home looking embarrassed. Janie even attempts to assault Tea Cake, but he prevents her from doing so, and the two of them finally reconcile after a passionate night of lovemaking.
  • When Tea Cake gets up in the morning, he declares his undying love for Janie and asserts that he has never had any feelings for Nunkie.
  • As soon as the harvest season is through, the migrant workers of the Everglades depart, and Janie’s sole remaining companion is Mrs. Turner, a mulatto woman who is proud of her white heritage and believes she is superior to everyone else in the community. Tea Cake despises Mrs. Turner because she has plans to destroy Janie’s marriage by introducing Janie to her brother
  • Tea Cake conspires with Sop-de-Bottom to drive the Turners from the Everglades
  • Tea Cake despises Mrs. Turner because she has plans to destroy Janie’s marriage by introducing Janie to her brother They fake a fight in Mrs. Turner’s restaurant and completely demolish everything in their scuffle. Mrs. Turner becomes dissatisfied and chooses to return to Miami
  • shortly after this amusing episode, a deadly hurricane makes landfall in the Everglades. Tea Cake could have avoided it if he had listened to his pals, but he chooses to disregard the warning signals and remain, along with the vast majority of the employees.
  • When the hurricane eventually arrives, Tea Cake and Janie find themselves in a precarious position. However, not before Janie is nearly drowned and Tea Cake is attacked by a vicious dog while trying to save her, his efforts bring them out alive.
  • Tea Cake begins to show indications of rabies a month after the initial infection. Eventually diagnosed with the sickness, only Janie is aware that it is terminal
  • Tea Cake grows progressively and unreasonably jealous whenever Janie is out of his sight
  • Tea Cake goes crazy and pulls a pistol on his wife
  • Tea Cake commits himself by shooting himself in the head. He and Janie find up in a gunfight, with both of their weapons pointing at the other. Tea Cake is being driven by the illness that has taken hold of him, and Janie shoots in self-defense. He dies in her grasp, biting the inside of her arm, and Janie mourns his passing.
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Tea Cake’s Death

  • Tea Cake’s death at the conclusion of Their Eyes Were Watching God is one of the most tragic, yet I believe there may have been a different outcome if the situation had been different.
  • Unfortunately, he dies after protecting Janie during the storm, but it was his fault that they stayed and had to battle to escape the storm in the first place.
  • It was a terrible decision on his part to stay, and he placed both his and her lives in jeopardy as a result.
  • He was her hero, yet he is not handled as a hero should be honored in the aftermath of a heroic death.
  • As a result of a rabies bite received from a stray dog that was caught up in the hurricane, he is driven to insane delirium.

I’m baffled as to why Janie refused to allow the doctor to take Tea Cake to the hospital so that she might be restrained.She would have been able to prevent him attempting to murder her.It is as a result of this that Janie is obliged to kill the man she loves in order to relieve him of his rabies-induced anguish.Because Janie is capable of finding pleasure after such a tragic event, it tells much about her perseverance and character.Of course, the wounds from that moment will definitely remain with her for the rest of her days, but she now possesses the mental fortitude to bear those scars on an equal footing with the rest of the world.

  1. We can be certain that if this had been the Janie we met at the beginning of the story, she would not have dealt with such a tremendous weight with the maturity that we see in her after getting to know Tea Cake.
  2. Tea Cake had to be put to death for this reason alone.
  3. Hurston needed to demonstrate to her readers that Janie was now capable of dealing with the hardships of life on her own.
  4. With Tea Cake still in the scene, we’d never be able to tell whether Janie was strong in and of herself or if she was strong because Tea Cake was protecting her.

Did Tea Cake have to die?

  • Tea Cake had to die in Their Eyes Were Watching God because if Janie had not shot him, he would have shot her, as depicted in the film.
  • It was a clear instance of self-defense, and Janie had no choice but to act in self-defense under the circumstances.
  • It was either kill or be killed in this situation.
  • However, had Janie not shot Tea Cake, it is extremely probable that he would have died an agonizing death as the result of being bitten by a rabid dog, which would have resulted in his death.
  • In the midst of a catastrophic cyclone that has brought death and ruin for kilometers around, Janie and Tea Cake find themselves trapped in the middle of it.

Tea Cake has been forced to conduct the gruesome duty of burying bodies in the middle of all of the commotion that has ensued.Even in death, the racism of the American South may be seen in the region.

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Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime. Get 48 Hours Free Access Already a member? Log in here. Janie and Tea Cake are caught up in a violent hurricane that has caused death and destruction for miles around. In the midst of all this chaos, Tea Cake has been forced to perform the grim task of burying corpses. Even in death, the racism of the American South rears its ugly head. Whereas white victims of the hurricane are given coffins, Black victims are simply dumped in a pit and covered with quicklime. Fortunately, Tea Cake and Janie manage to get away. However, their problems are only just beginning. Tea Cake has been bitten by a dog, and now it looks as if that dog had rabies. Tea Cake’s mental health is rapidly starting to deteriorate, and his mind is filled with paranoid delusions. Before long, things get so bad that it’s dangerous for Janie to be around Tea Cake. It’s just a matter of time before things get out of hand. And tragically, so it proves. Tea Cake becomes so angry and paranoid that he raises his pistol towards Janie. The first time he pulls the trigger, he gets an empty chamber. This gives Janie the time she needs to point her rifle at Tea Cake in the hopes of getting him to back off. Unfortunately, this doesn’t work, as Tea Cake gets ready to shoot her once more. Janie can’t afford to take any chances; she shoots him dead. Under the circumstances, she had no alternative; if she hadn’t killed Tea Cake, he most certainly would have killed her. Approved by eNotes Editorial Team Like this answer? eNotes educators offer personalized private tutoring. Contact us at 888-847-6897 or send us a message for more information.

Their Eyes Were Watching God: Tea Cake

  • Tea Cake serves as a spark, assisting Janie in the pursuit of her ambitions and aspirations.
  • He, like all of the other men in Janie’s life, is only a supporting actor in the story.
  • Janie had already begun to discover her own voice prior to Jody’s arrival, as evidenced by the fact that she eventually confronts Jody face to face.
  • As we see at the conclusion of the story, Janie stays strong and hopeful in the face of Tea Cake’s death; therefore, it is reasonable to conclude that Janie is not reliant on Tea Cake.
  • Despite this, he does play an important part in her growth and development.

Janie had already begun to build a strong, self-assured sense of self by the time she meets Tea Cake, but Tea Cake helps her to speed her spiritual development.Janie has known since that fateful moment under the pear tree that she will only be able to discover what she is looking for via the power of love.Tea Cake is a character with a creative and energetic personality who likes examining the world around him and who understands and appreciates Janie’s desire to grow.Unlike Logan, who treats her as if she is a farm animal and Jody, who ignores her, Tea Cake engages in conversation and engages in play with her.Instead of suffocating her personality, he nurtures it by exposing her to a variety of fresh experiences and abilities.

  1. In spite of the fact that Tea Cake is essential to Janie’s development, he is not an essential component of her life, a fact that is revealed when Janie shoots him.
  2. He plays an important part in her life, assisting her in gaining a deeper understanding of herself.
  3. Ironically, by teaching her how to fire a rifle, he gives her with the very weapons that would ultimately lead to his death.
  4. Rather than surrendering her life to the insane Tea Cake, Janie chooses to save herself, demonstrating her growing sense of self in the novel.
  1. It also demonstrates that Tea Cake’s ultimate function in the novel is not to make Janie reliant on him for happiness, but to assist her in finding happiness and security within herself.

What is the description of Tea Cake from the book Their Eyes Were Watching God?

Tea Cake’s true name is Vergible Woods, and he comes from a family of woodsmen. He meets the heroine Janie after she has been through two marriages that have been less than satisfying. Tea Cake is twenty-five years old and does not have much material money, but he possesses an inner wealth that Janie has never previously met. He is self-aware and understands who he is.

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  • It is actually Vergible Woods who is the genuine name of Tea Cake.

He meets the heroine Janie after she has been through two marriages that have been less than satisfying.Tea Cake is twenty-five years old and does not have much material money, but he possesses an inner wealth that Janie has never previously met.He is well-aware of himself as a human being, and he exudes the self-assurance that comes with knowledge and comprehension of one’s own existence.Janie and Tea Cake are married and go back to his hometown of Jacksonville, Tennessee, with their children.Tea Cake is supportive of Janie’s engagement in the community, as she carves out a place for herself in it and their home is transformed into a social hub for the neighborhood.

  1. Tea Cake teaches Janie how to play checkers and disregards the traditional gender line by taking her fishing and hunting with him on the weekends.
  2. He then instructs her on how to fish and hunt on her own.
  3. Tea Cake’s demeanor and thinking are marred by the fact that he strikes Janie on the head.
  4. The conclusion of their tale as a couple has an ironic twist.
  1. After saving Janie from a vicious dog, Tea Cake is attacked and bitten by the animal.
  2. He becomes infected with rabies.
  3. When the disease developed swiftly, Tea Cake had already succumbed to irreversible symptoms before anybody realized he’d contracted rabies or could administer treatment for it.
  4. In his most aggressive and wildly demented state, he rushes Janie with the intent of killing her, and Janie has no choice but to shoot him in order to defend herself.
  5. The irony is that (1) Tea Cake received his death sentence, the bite, while rescuing Janie; (2) he was able to beat her while also rescuing her; (3) she killed him using a skill he taught her; and (4) the end result of his physical attacks on her was his death at her hands as a result of those attacks.
  6. Tea Cakes’ aggression toward Janie has been seen by some observers as validation of the natural male desire to dominate women.
  • An opposing interpretation of Tea Cake’s death can be made on the basis of the ironic twist involved, which asserts that the author is demonstrating the true light of male dominance over women through symbolic judgment (the rabies bite) and execution (the killing shot), thus demonstrating that even the acts of teaching and saving Janie can neither atone for nor overshadow physical brutality.

Their Eyes Were Watching God Chapter 19 Summary & Analysis

  • Death has spread over Palm Beach as a result of the hurricane.
  • Tea Cake is forced to bury bodies by two white guys armed with firearms.
  • Because they are dissatisfied with their jobs and scared of prejudice in the town (where white bodies are buried in coffins but black bodies are just dumped in a ditch and smeared with quicklime), Tea Cake and Janie decide to leave the town on the sly and return to their home in the Everglades.
  • Tea Cake and Janie discover that, despite the fact that some of their friends have perished, many more have survived, including Motor Boat, who somehow survived the storm while resting in the abandoned house.
  • Tea Cake spends a considerable amount of time repairing the dike.

But he comes home from work early one day around four weeks after they have returned, complaining of a severe headache.He claims to be hungry, but when Janie prepares food for him, he is unable to consume any of it.He has choking fits in the middle of the night and gags when he tries to sip water the next morning.Dr.Simmons, a nice white guy who has become a fixture in the mud, is assigned to Janie.

  1. He strikes up a friendly conversation with Tea Cake and listens to his narrative.
  2. However, after the incident, he draws Janie aside and informs her that he believes the dog that bit Tea Cake was a rabid dog.
  3. It is likely too late to rescue Tea Cake, he says, but he will order medication from Palm Beach in case it is still possible to save her.
  4. While his health deteriorates, the rabies affects his mental state, causing him to have delusional and paranoid beliefs, which he then acts on.
  1. Despite his repeated requests, Janie does not inform him of the doctor’s diagnosis.
  2. She is accused of slipping out to see if the medication has arrived, by Tea Cake, who believes she is sneaking away to meet Mrs.
  3. Turner’s brother, who has recently returned to the Everglades.
  4. She reassures him by informing him that she had gone to the doctor, and the two of them continue to converse warmly.
  5. Janie, on the other hand, becomes alarmed when she discovers a weapon stashed beneath the pillow.
  6. Tea Cake is subjected to a second round of choking assaults that night.
  • Janie informs us that she will be seeing Dr.
  • Simmons again the following morning.
  • The enraged Tea Cake goes outside to use the outhouse, and Janie checks his weapon before allowing him to go in.
  • She discovers that it is armed with three rounds in the chamber.
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Instead of emptying it, she configures it such that it would cycle through the three empty chambers before reaching a bullet, allowing her enough time to react in the event that he fires at her from behind her back.The second time Tea Cake returns, he becomes much insane, accusing Janie of having treated him unfairly.Janie notices that he is holding a weapon in his hand.The trigger is pulled once and the chamber is selected by the gun’s internal mechanism.Janie snatches the weapon and fires it at him in the hopes of frightening him away.In the meantime, he continues to squeeze the trigger twice more, and as he is ready to fire again, Janie is forced to shoot him.

The next day, Janie is brought before the court.Every Black person from the mud has gathered in the courthouse to observe, and Janie has the distinct impression that all of her former friends have turned against her; some have even offered to testify against her in court.Despite the fact that Dr.Simmons testifies in Janie’s defense, it is Janie who delivers the most moving testimony of all, telling the court about their relationship and her affection for Tea Cake.

The all-white, all-male jury determines that she is not guilty.Her erstwhile pals slip out of the room, dejected, as the white ladies who were witnessing the events gathered around her in sympathy.Tea Cake is given a royal burial by Janie following the conclusion of the trial.

Analysis: Chapter 19 

  • January’s spiritual journey comes to a close in Chapter 19, and she endures a great lot as a result of her experiences.
  • When the narrator says that ″all gods want blood,″ he is referring to Janie’s sufferings as her final sacrifices on the road to liberty and enlightenment.
  • Tea Cake’s first test occurs when she is forced into the racist burial crew, which is her first trial.
  • When compared to Hurston’s handling of Mrs.
  • Turner, this story depicts racism in a more typical manner, with white people forcing their will over Black people.

Nonetheless, racism is portrayed as more of an environmental force or cultural construct than as an inherent characteristic of any given individual.Despite the fact that the white guys are not identified, racism appears to be more a consequence of the environment and circumstances than anything else; Tea Cake and Janie are able to escape it by fleeing the neighborhood.More information on the theme of race and racism may be found here.The second adversity that Janie must deal with is Tea Cake’s illness and subsequent decline.Once again, Janie and Tea Cake are challenged not by a specific individual but by an impersonal force: an illness that he catches as a result of events that occur during the hurricane that they are trying to avoid.

  1. Compared to the guy he used to be, the ill Tea Cake flies into jealous rages and is the polar opposite of the man he used to be, content in the presence of nature and typically confident in his possession of Janie.
  2. To put it another way, this arbitrary force annihilates the entire essence of Tea Cake.
  3. It is difficult for Janie to see Tea Cake’s death, but it is a reflection of how far she has progressed as a person and how confident she has become.
  4. Despite the fact that Tea Cake is everything to her, she is able to kill him in order to rescue herself.
  1. Her connection with him has guided her along the path of enlightenment, and now that she has reached the horizon, she has gained the strength to live on her own for the first time in her life.
  2. More information on why Janie murders Tea Cake may be found here.
  3. The scenario in the courtroom depicts Janie’s ultimate trial.
  4. This time, she faces exclusion from the same community that has nurtured her development and provided support during the hurricane, a punishment worse than any the court could impose: ″It was not death she feared.
  5. It was exclusion from the community that had nurtured her development and provided support during the hurricane.″ ″There was a miscommunication.″ She is not in need of superficial acceptability in the porch gossip culture; she has already shunned that world; but she is in need of the community to acknowledge the depth of her link with Tea Cake, as well as her own fortitude, in order for her to move forward.
  6. Learn more about Janie’s interactions with the residents of the Everglades in this article.
  • Hurston employs an uncommon narrative method at this point in the novel, which has been the subject of considerable discussion since its publication.
  • Janie continues to talk uninterrupted for the majority of the second part of the narrative.
  • She has discovered her own unique voice, and language has evolved into a method for her to explore herself, assert herself, and enjoy human connection.
  • Hurston, on the other hand, orders her to remain mute during the trial.

Unlike the majority of the work, where speech is portrayed in strong, direct quotes, the narrator here recounts Janie’s words in a more oblique manner than the rest.Janie herself does not address the reader in any way.The section begins, ″She talked….She talked…″ She just sat there and delivered the story, and when she was finished, she hushed the room.″ Learn more about Hurston’s writing style and how it changes throughout the work.Critics have suggested that Janie’s mission has not been completed, that she has not found her voice or reached the horizon as a result of this transition.Other reviewers, most notably Alice Walker, have claimed, as Mary Ellen Washington recalls in the preface to most recent editions of the book, that Janie’s quiet symbolizes her command of her own voice, which is supported by the author’s own words.

This point of view is consistent with the interpretation of Janie’s passive acceptance of Tea Cake’s thrashing of her in Chapter 17 as a proof of her strength by the other characters.Find out more about the relationship between Janie’s developing voice and her own inner development in this article.After everything is said and done, Janie survives the trial; yet, in a final, nuanced statement on race, Janie is embraced by the white ladies while being rejected by the African-American society.In this instance, Hurston’s anthropological ideas on race appear to be reflected: racism is a cultural construct, and as such, Black people are as vulnerable (or possibly resistant) to its ideologies as anybody else.

Ultimately, Janie’s mission is neither simply a Black person’s goal or a woman’s quest (although her race and gender are obviously relevant), but rather a genuinely human quest, which is reinforced in the closing scene of the novel.Read on to learn more about the novel’s relationship to other Black works from the same period.

Their Eyes Were Watching God: Questions & Answers

  1. What is the significance of the title?
  2. Janie and Tea Cake seek refuge from a roaring hurricane in Chapter 18, which serves as the inspiration for Hurston’s book’s title.
  3. Hurston describes how they waited to see how nature would decide their fate, saying, ″They appeared to be peering into the darkness, but their eyes were watching God.″ Hurston also describes how they prayed.
  4. With this phrase, the characters acknowledge that they have no control over their own lives and that the only way they can be saved from the wrath of nature is if God decides to intervene and save them from themselves.

What is it about Janie’s grandma that encourages her to marry at such a young age?When Nanny witnesses Janie kissing a boy across the street, she recognizes that she has developed a growing interest in sex.In fear that Janie’s sexual awakening will bring her down, Nanny coerces her into marrying Logan Killicks, despite her original request that Janie attend to school and ″choose from a higher bush and a sweeter berry″ instead.Specifically, Nanny is anxious that if she passes away before Janie can marry, Janie would be left without financial means.

The ″muck″ in which Janie and Tea Cake dwell is described as follows: Tea Cake and Janie both work as migrant laborers in the Everglades, a marshy region in Florida where the muck alludes to the Everglades.Because everything surrounding the muck is ″large and fresh,″ it represents a kind of retreat for Janie, not just because she and Tea Cake find enjoyment there, but also because it represents a welcome departure from the chattering, nosy neighbors to whom she had become used.What exactly does Janie think of Jody’s passing?

  1. As a result of Jody’s death, Janie enjoys ″being alone for a change.″ Even while she expresses regret for the pain Jody endured during his death and expresses ″pity for the first time in years″ for the way life ″mishandled″ him, Janie is relieved to be free of the burden her marriage placed on her.
  2. Janie tears her kerchief off her head immediately after Jody’s death, indicating the freedom she feels to be herself once more following Jody’s death.
  3. What is the significance of the porch?
  4. In Their Eyes Were Watching God, the novel opens and finishes on Janie’s porch in Eatonville, which serves as a representation of the town in their story.
  5. In contrast to the sexist or nosy gossiping porch-sitters who frequently appear in the novel, Janie’s position on the porch with Pheoby serves as a constant reminder that she has a platform from which she may tell her narrative.
  6. In Pheoby’s ″hungry listening,″ the porch is portrayed as a secure haven where Janie may be in complete command of her own life’s circumstances.
  1. Are there any details on the personal histories of Nanny, Janie’s grandmother, and Janie’s mother available?
  2. nanny, Janie’s grandma, was born into slavery and gave birth to Janie’s mother in a relationship with a white master.
  3. Nanny fled with her daughter after her master died, claiming that the master’s widow had threatened to sell Janie’s mother.
  4. Following the abolition of slavery at the conclusion of the Civil War, Nanny ″met up with some fine white people″ and relocated to West Florida.
  1. She cared for Leafy, Janie’s mother, and saw to it that she acquired an excellent educational foundation.
  2. Leafy, on the other hand, was raped by a white schoolmaster and turned to drinking, leaving Nanny to care for Janie alone.
  3. What were the names of Janie’s three husbands?

Logan Killicks was Janie’s first husband, and he was a much older guy.The marriage began as a result of an agreement made by Janie’s grandmother, Nanny, and ended when Janie divorced Joe Starks, her second husband, and moved out.When Joe Starks died, the couple’s marriage came to an end.Vergible Woods, sometimes known as Tea Cake, was Janie’s third spouse.

When Janie sold Joe’s shop and relocated to Jacksonville with Tea Cake, the beginning of their marriage was marked.When Janie murdered Tea Cake in self-defense, the marriage came to an end.When it comes to the novel, what importance does Janie’s physical appearance play?With her stunning beauty, Janie entices the attention of her husbands and other men.Her fair skin and long, wavy hair give the impression that she is of higher social position to some individuals, particularly African Americans.

Mrs.Turner, for example, tries to disintegrate Janie’s marriage to the darker-skinned Tea Cake in order for Janie to marry Mrs.Turner’s brother, who is also darker in complexion.Mrs.Turner’s machinations aid in the development of false allegations that Janie is disloyal to Tea Cake, and as a result of these rumors, some people believe Janie is responsible for Tea Cake’s death.The fact that Janie has pale complexion is also one of the reasons why the white jury acquits her of murder.

  • In the words of a Black spectator, ″Aw you know dem white mens are not going to do nothin’ to no women who look like her.″ What is it about Joe Starks that makes him such a natural leader?
  • Joe Starks is described as a ″citified, tastefully dressed man″ who walks ″as though he knew exactly where he was.″ Affluence and the acquisition of Janie, a beautiful wife, both help to boost Joe’s self-confidence.
  • Joe is likewise ambitious and prepared to put in the effort necessary to achieve his goals.
  • ″Ah plans to put mah hands to the plow heah, and strain every nerve tuh build dis our town de metropolis uh de state,″ ho declares upon landing in Eatonville.
  • Joe is a shrewd businessman who buys and sells land rapidly, establishes a store, and even contributes to the development of Eatonville by donating a street lamp.
  • Joe’s enthusiasm and innovative ideas inspire people to want to please and follow him.

What is Joe Starks’ attitude about Janie?In some aspects, Joe Starks is kind to Janie: he constructs her a large house and provides her with lovely clothing, and she receives the respect that should be shown to the wife of the mayor.Joe, on the other hand, is a highly controlling and jealous individual.He orders Janie to cover her hair so that other guys will not be able to see it.

Joe also commands Janie’s attention and criticizes her in front of the other members of the group.He treats her badly, and she copes with her rage by keeping up exterior appearances and withdrawing inside herself: ″She had an inside and an outside now, and suddenly she realized how important it was not to mix them together.″ What is it about the relationship between Janie and Tea Cake that has the inhabitants of Eatonville so up in arms?For a variety of reasons, the romance between Janie and Tea Cake has enraged the residents of Eatonville.Tea Cake is ″almost twelve years younger″ than Janie, who is ″nearly twelve years older.″ When it comes to Janie, she is a wealthy widow who owns both a home and a business, and Tea Cake ″can’t do nothin’ but assist her spend whut she earned.″ Tea Cake, according to the Eatonville neighbors, is just interested in Janie’s money.

Furthermore, they criticize Janie for dressing in bright colors and disrespecting the memories of her deceased husband, both of which are true.Moreover, the residents of Eatonville are aware that Tea Cake is a gambler, a fact that Janie does not learn about until after they have been married.During their time in the Everglades, Janie and Tea Cake must figure out how to maintain themselves.

  1. Janie and Tea Cake travel to the Everglades in order to find employment collecting beans, and Tea Cake also makes money through gambling while there.
  2. ″I can’t lose between de beans and the dice,″ Tea Cake declares.
  3. In addition, Janie and Tea Cake provide for their family by hunting and fishing in the surrounding area.
  • They also hunt alligators for the purpose of ″selling the skins and teeth in Palm Beach,″ as they put it.
  • What kind of interactions does Janie have with the ladies she encounters in the Everglades?
  • When the other ladies first meet Janie, they assume she’s ″a peculiar case in the mud.″ Her superiority complex led many to believe that she considered herself ″too good to work with the rest of the ladies.″ It is only until Janie begins harvesting beans with them that the other ladies come to embrace her.
  • Janie is delighted to join the throngs gathered around Tea Cake, but she has feelings of envy toward a younger lady with whom Tea Cake appears to be flirting.
  • Janie also becomes ″visiting pals″ with Mrs.
  • Turner, a woman who sees Janie’s fair complexion as a sign of better social standing and who encourages Janie to abandon Tea Cake and move in with her brother, Mr.
  • Turner.
  • Mrs.
  • Turner’s demeanor exemplifies the distinctions between Janie and the other women in the Everglades, as does her behavior.

After Tea Cake’s death, it becomes evident that Janie will never be truly welcomed by the group of friends.What is the reason behind Janie’s death of Tea Cake?Tea Cake is killed by Janie in order to save her own life.When Tea Cake was saving Janie from an angry dog during the hurricane, he got bitten.This was just a few weeks previously.

Even though Tea Cake becomes ill, it is too late to save him by the time a doctor comes to visit him and finds that the dog has infected Tea Cake with rabies.Tea Cake becomes worse and more aggressive as time goes on, and he begins to believe that Janie is cheating on him, leading him to sleep with a gun.To protect herself in the event that Tea Cake turns aggressive, Janie prepares to fire a gun.Tea Cake finally loses his head and shoots at Janie, who kills him in self-defense after he shoots at her.Once she returns to Eatonville, how does Janie communicate with the community about what has transpired while she has been away?Janie does not speak openly to her neighbors; instead, she confides in Pheoby Watson, her best friend, about her experiences.

  • Then Janie grants Pheoby permission to inform the rest of the group.
  • Janie is well aware that her neighbors will be perplexed as to why she adored Tea Cake.
  • However, she requests that Pheoby inform them that ″Love is lak de sea.″ Despite the fact that it’s a’movin’ item, it nonetheless retains its shape based on which coast it comes into contact with, which is different with each shore.″
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Why Tea Cake Had to Die

  1. I have to say that Tea Cake’s death at the conclusion of Their Eyes Were Watching God is one of the most heartbreaking literary scenes I have ever encountered.
  2. It’s a shame that he isn’t even given the honorable death that he so well deserves.
  3. He was the one who, at long last, allowed Janie to see the world in a way that she could grow to appreciate and respect.
  4. He was her hero, yet he is not handled as a hero should be honored in the aftermath of a heroic death.

As a result of a rabies bite received from a stray dog that was caught up in the hurricane, he is driven to insane delirium.It is as a result of this that Janie is obliged to kill the man she loves in order to relieve him of his rabies-induced anguish.Because Janie is capable of finding pleasure after such a tragic event, it tells much about her perseverance and character.Of course, the wounds from that moment will definitely remain with her for the rest of her days, but she now possesses the mental fortitude to bear those scars on an equal footing with the rest of the world.

We can be certain that if this had been the Janie we met at the beginning of the story, she would not have dealt with such a tremendous weight with the maturity that we see in her after getting to know Tea Cake.Tea Cake had to be put to death for this reason alone.Hurston needed to demonstrate to her readers that Janie was now capable of dealing with the hardships of life on her own.

  1. With Tea Cake still in the scene, we’d never be able to tell whether Janie was strong in and of herself or if she was strong because Tea Cake was protecting her.

Their Eyes Were Watching God Chapters 17–18 Summary & Analysis

  1. A number of familiar characters return as the season gets underway, while others make their debut.
  2. Mrs.
  3. Turner sends her brother to town, and Tea Cake, feeling threatened, beats Janie in order to demonstrate that he still has authority over her body.
  4. Afterward, he lavishes her with attention, and Janie has no ill will against him.

All of the other guys are jealous of his dominance over her.Workers receive their paychecks on Saturdays, and many of them spend their money on alcoholic beverages.On a certain Saturday, two men named Dick Sterrett and Coode may become drunk and cause a commotion by walking throughout town creating noise.They eventually arrive to Mrs.

Turner’s restaurant, where Tea Cake and his entourage are enjoying a meal.They become raucous, and a fight erupts amongst them.Tea Cake tries all he can to get rid of the two and get on Mrs.

  1. Turner’s good side, but his attempts only result in more chaos.
  2. Mrs.
  3. Turner is crushed and injured as a result of the destruction of the restaurant.
  4. She is enraged at her husband for standing by and watching the roustabouts destroy her business.

Summary: Chapter 18

  1. They were seated among the others…
  2. Despite the fact that they appeared to be looking at nothing, their eyes were fixed on God.
  3. See Important Quotations Explained for further information.
  4. Janie witnesses many groups of Native Americans leaving the Everglades and heading towards Palm Beach one day.

She inquires as to their motivation for departing, and they explain that a storm is approaching.The news travels across the community, and everyone begins to watch with increasing anticipation.The number of indigenous people who depart increases over the following several days, and animals begin to flee in the same direction.Workers begin to leave the community within a short period of time.

Tea Cake refuses to go despite the fact that he has been offered a ride to higher ground.Several of the guys who have decided to stay congregate at Tea Cake’s home, where they throw a party.However, as the storm intensifies, all of the guys, with the exception of Motor Boat, depart for their own homes.

  1. This evening and the next day, a storm looms in the distance, and the massive Lake Okechobee begins to roil in response.
  2. Their eyes are ″watching God″ while the three of them wait out the storm in the shanties.
  3. Tea Cake speculates that Janie would have rather to have stayed in her large home in Eatonville, but Janie responds that she doesn’t care what happens as long as they are able to spend time together.
  4. When he steps outdoors, he discovers that a major flood has begun.
  5. They make the decision to escape.
  6. Tea Cake, Janie, and Motor Boat move east, arms clasped against the wind, to higher land.
  1. They collect some important papers and then head west to higher ground.
  2. After a few moments, the three of them realize the Okechobee’s dikes have failed and that the lake is rushing toward them, destroying everything in its path as it does so.
  3. They have to hustle to get to an abandoned, towering home on a small hill, where they decide to take refuge for the night.
  4. After a brief nap, Janie awakens to the sight of the lake becoming closer.
  1. Motor Boat, on the other hand, chooses to remain in the house with her and Tea Cake.
  2. The pair continues their journey despite their exhaustion, and the flooding becomes so severe that they are forced to swim long distances.
  3. They travel through bodies and horrific devastation on their journey.

Janie is blown into choppy water while attempting to clutch a piece of roofing for protection.She is struggling, but suddenly she notices a cow floating past with a snarling dog perched on its back.She panics and runs away.She clings to the cow’s tail for protection, but the dog quickly turns on her and begins to attack her.

Tea Cake jumps to the rescue and wrestles with the beast in the water, which bites him on the face before being stabbed to death by Tea Cake’s sword.The following day, Janie and Tea Cake arrive at Palm Beach, which has been reduced to a state of chaos.They eventually locate a spot to relax, and Janie expresses gratitude to Tea Cake for saving her life.

Analysis: Chapters 17–18

  1. Chapter 17 gives yet another insight into life in the muck, further confounding our understanding of Janie and Tea Cake’s connection shortly before the climactic arrival of the hurricane in Chapter 18.
  2. Chapter 18 is the culmination of the novel.
  3. The beating of Janie by Tea Cake, which occurs early in Chapter 17, is one of the most perplexing events in the narrative.
  4. Modern readers may be startled to see that Janie’s thrashing had such little influence on her overall well-being.

It is tempting to connect Hurston’s brief account of the episode to the more lenient attitude toward domestic violence that prevalent at the time Hurston wrote Their Eyes Were Watching God, but this is not a reasonable conclusion to draw.Jane’s passive acceptance of the beating, on the other hand, is important for the development of her character.Continue reading about life in the muck.At this point in the novel, the concept of silence takes on enormous significance for the characters.

Since Jody’s death, Janie has battled to find her own voice and express herself.Now that she has discovered it, she is working on gaining control over it.In Janie’s relationship with Jody, quiet is a symbol of dominance; nevertheless, silence is now becoming an essential aspect of Janie’s power.

  1. She has complete control over when she speaks and when she does not.
  2. It is hinted that she is prepared to sacrifice her body in order to fulfill Tea Cake’s craving for control in this predicament.
  3. Her strength is reflected in her quiet.
  4. She puts up with a beating, just once, because she believes she is strong enough to survive it and because the bad repercussions of the beating are exceeded by her affection for Tea Cake and the pleasant things that he does for her in exchange for it.
  5. More information on the subject of speech and quiet may be found here.
  6. Chapter 18 serves as the book’s conclusion in a number of ways.
  1. Because of Janie’s struggle with the hurricane, the title of the novel was inspired by that event, which also serves to illustrate the story’s primary conflict: Janie’s quasi-religious journey to discover her place in the world amid perplexing, unexpected, and often dangerous forces.
  2. Characters in the novel have labored under the misconception that they can exert control over their environment and establish a place for themselves in the world throughout the novel.
  3. In his attempts to play God, Jody, in particular, displays the absurdity of this way of thinking about things.
  4. Tea Cake is also a victim of this blundering.
  1. It is because of his comfort in the natural environment—his command of the muck, his nearly miraculous ability at gambling—that he has become overconfident, and he believes that the storm is not a threat.
  2. Learn more about the significance of the novel’s title in this article.
  3. But, of course, the storm brings everyone to their knees.

It is a force of sheer devastation and disorder; worse, it is a force that lacks both a conscience and a sense of identity.A harsh and destructive element of an otherwise perplexing cosmos, it is random and unjust.Over the course of the novel, Janie is confronted with a number of comparable forces: the beliefs to which Nanny, Logan, and Jody subscribe; Mrs.Turner’s racism; the sexism of Eatonville’s males; and the gossip of the porch culture.

These forces, like the hurricane, give Janie discomfort but do not want to harm her in any way.Janie will never be able to beat them; she will only be able to bear them and possibly survive them.Read more about how the community came together to assist Janie endure her situation.It is most evident in the episode in which Tea Cake, Janie, and Motor Boat wait out a storm, which is the most blatant representation of this tension.As Janie and her companions battle nature, we witness the most extreme manifestation of the conflict between person and environment: humanity vs God, and God versus nature.

The struggle is expressed in terms of a sense of belonging.Upon arriving in their home, Janie and Tea Cake are joined by Motor Boat, and all of the people who live in the muck are united in the same dreadful communion, unified against an incredibly terrifying environment.People who are tied together by circumstance form communities and intimate relationships, which serve as humanity’s last line of defense against hostile forces.More information on the subject of humans vs nature may be found here.In Tea Cake and Janie’s friendship, we see the most personal sort of shared link, and once again, reciprocity is at the heart of their relationship; they both assist the other in order to stay alive.It is through their friendship that Janie will find the final solution to her spiritual search.

  • Tea Cake has assisted her in discovering her own voice, and it is through this voice that she has been able to establish a love based on reciprocity and mutual respect.
  • This relationship enables her to face the storm head-on and to withstand the storm as well as any later conflicts that may arise.
  • More information on the issue of love and relationships vs independence may be found here.

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Their Eyes Were Watching God

Zora Neale Hurston

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  2. Doctor Simmons, the white doctor who appears out of nowhere in the mud, informs Janie about Tea Cake’s rabies infection following a dog bite sustained during the cyclone.
  3. When Janie is taken to court following Tea Cake’s death, Dr.
  4. Simmons testifies in her defense, telling the jury that Tea Cake was a dangerous man and that she was justified in killing him in self-defense.

Dr.Simmons’ testimony is broadcast on television.The whole Their Eyes Were Watching God LitChart as a printable PDF is available for download.″My pupils can’t get enough of your charts, and their test scores have skyrocketed as a result of them.″ -Graham S., a.k.a.

Graham S.

Dr. Simmons Character Timeline in Their Eyes Were Watching God

  1. The following chronology contains all of the appearances of the character Dr.
  2. Simmons in Their Eyes Were Watching God.
  3. the cup to his lips, he nearly vomited due to his thirst, and the colorful dots and symbols show which themes are related with that look Worried, Janie calls for Dr.
  4. Simmons, the white doctor who practices in the mud and is well-liked by the locals.

Following that, Tea Cake explains.To be sure, tho

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